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5 Tips to get your online marketing ready for swimsuit season

What does summertime have to do with your waistline and your business? Well, if your business is at all seasonal, you’re gearing up for summer traffic peaks or slower demand as people go on holiday. At the same time, if you’re like me, you’re likely worrying about what you’re going to look like (and feel like) the first time you put on a swim suit this year. While the outcomes of getting ready to wear a bathing suit and getting your business ready for summer couldn’t be more different, the best practices of the two overlap a lot more than you’d think. And the best thing about this list is that it works whether your business is seasonal or whether summer’s just another day in the office. What do I mean? Well, read on to see 5 tips to get your business ready for swimsuit season.

  1. Visualize your dream (suit). Virtually nobody looks like Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie in a swim suit (or just about anything else for that matter). But that doesn’t mean you can’t aspire to greatness. Make sure you’ve set the right goals about what you want from your business this summer. Then use those goals to drive your activities before, during and after peak season.
  2. BTF-SwimSuit
    Photo credit: Wikipedia
  3. Focus on your best areas. Just like no swim suit works for everyone, not every marketing activity you’re trying today works for your business. Assess where you are in your activities and trim those activities that aren’t working for you. Instead, focus on those areas providing the greatest return and buy yourself time to test new ideas that might work better.
  4. Accessorize. Looking good often depends on having the right accessories. By the same token, you can spice up your marketing by building on your core and trying some new things. Whether you call it “agile marketing” or “doing it wrong quickly,” the idea is to test ideas quickly, learn from those tests, and build on that learning to drive greater results. Just like a great diver’s watch or fun cover-up can make a good swim suit look better, the right marketing “accessories” can improve your overall efforts dramatically.
  5. If you can’t be thin, buy rich. While you don’t necessarily need to spend a lot on marketing, don’t skimp on the areas that help you be most effective. Whether it’s getting the right tools or upgrading your team’s skills, don’t be afraid to spend a little money on the areas that matter most to your business’s success.
  6. Size doesn’t matter. Remember, your goal isn’t necessarily to grow huge–especially when it comes to swimsuits! It’s to see progress from where you are. Track where your business is today relative to where you were a month ago, a quarter, a year. For seasonal businesses, evaluating where you are year-on-year is particularly critical. But even if your business stays relatively constant all year round, make sure that you’re moving in the right direction and hitting your key performance indicators. Steady growth you can manage often produces greater long-term benefit than short-term, but unsustainable, jumps in business.

Whether you need your marketing to work 365 days a year or, like your bathing suit, just for the next few months, these tips can help keep your business in shape and looking good all summer long.

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Tim Peter

Tim Peter built his first website in 1995 and loves that he still gets to do that every day. Tim has spent almost two decades figuring out where customers are, how they interact with brands online, and delivering those customers to his clients’ front door. These efforts have generated billions of dollars in revenue and reduced costs. Tim works with client organizations to build effective teams focused on converting browsers to buyers and building their brand and business. He helps those companies discover how marketing, technology, and analytics tie together to drive business results. He doesn't get excited because of the toys or tech. He gets excited because of what it all means for the bottom line. An expert in e-commerce and digital marketing strategy, web development, search marketing, and analytics, Tim focuses on the growth of the social, local, mobile web and its impact on both consumer behavior and business results. He is a member of the Search Engine Marketers Professional Organization (SEMPO), HSMAI, and the Digital Analytics Association. Tim Peter’s recent client work covers a wide range of digital marketing activities including developing digital and mobile marketing strategies, creating digital product roadmaps, assessing organizational capabilities, and conducting vendor evaluations for diverse clients including major hospitality companies, real estate brands, SaaS providers, and marketing agencies. Prior to launching Tim Peter & Associates, LLC, a full-service e-commerce and internet marketing consulting firm in early 2011, he worked with the world’s largest hotel franchisor, the world’s premier independent luxury hotel representation firm, and a major financial services firm, developing various award-winning products and services for his customers. Tim can be reached at tim@timpeter.com or by phone at 201-305-0055.

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  1. Avatar Alisa

    At Think Big Online (in Australia, where we know a thing or two about swimsuits), we want our clients to embrace the power of “trying some new things” — a very good point that you make in this well-crafted article. I believe that doing the same old things will get the same old results–http://www.thinkbigonline.com.au/are-you-looking-to-impress/. I like that this is written by you, Tim, a man, as it highlights that both women and men need some prep before swimsuit season–just like businesses big and small can use an infusion of something fresh. Alisa

  2. Avatar Tim Peter

    Thanks, Alisa, for reading and for your great comment. Figuring out how to balance trusted techniques and new ideas (or, as I like to call them, “core and explore”), is a common challenge. The companies that get that balance right typically enjoy the greatest success. Thanks for calling attention to that point.

    Oh, and P.S., it’s true. Some guys (especially men of a certain age), worry what they look like in swim suits at least as much as women do. Thanks for point that out, too. 😉

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