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English: Target

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To reach cold prospects among business audiences, sales and marketing teams often begin by developing a list of prospective targets.  Marketers can find just about every target company, title and job function they need from traditional list suppliers.  Plus, the Internet has made possible the introduction of some excellent new opportunities for identifying prospects at various stages of the buying cycle.  Let’s look at what’s new in B2B lists these days. Traditionally, the first step in list development has been working with a list broker who has experience in your target audience category.  There are more than 40,000 business lists available for rent in the U.S., plus numerous databases and online data enhancement services to choose from.

Business lists can be divided into four general types:

  1. Compiled files assembled from directories, the Internet, or other public and private sources, by such suppliers as D&B, InfoGroup, Data.com, NetProspex and ZoomInfo. In recent years, many compilers have been making their data available for rent via an online interface, vastly enhancing the speed and flexibility of ordering.
  2. Response files created as a by-product of other businesses, like catalog/e-commerce sales, seminars, trade organization memberships, or magazine and newsletter subscriptions.  Response files tend to be more current and accurate than compiled files.
  3. Cooperative databases from multiple list owners, offered in either open format, where you pay for what you use (examples being MeritDirect’s MeritBase, InfoGroup’s b2bdatawarehouse and Mardev DM2’s Decisionmaker database), or closed format, where only members who put customer names in can take prospect names out (examples include Epsilon Abacus Cooperative and the b2bBase, a joint venture of MeritDirect and Experian).
  4. Internal databases populated from billing systems, lead management systems, and website registration systems.  Many companies today use their marketing automation or CRM systems as their marketing databases, and populate them from a variety of internal and external sources.

A new direction in B2B lists

The B2B list industry has changed considerably in the last decade, with the proliferation of social networks.  But the big new development today is the trend away from static name/address lists, to dynamic sourcing of prospect names complete with valuable indicators of buying readiness culled from their actual behavior online.  Companies such as InsideView and Leadspace are developing solutions in this area.

Leadspace, created by a team of former Israeli intelligence officers, is a leader in targeted, real-time prospecting data for business marketers.   Their process begins with constructing an ideal buyer persona by analyzing the client’s best customers, which can be executed by uploading a few hundred records of name, company name and email address.  Then, Leadspace scours the Internet, social networks and scores of contact databases for look-alikes and immediately delivers prospect names, fresh contact information and additional data about their professional activities.

How LevelEleven took its prospecting to the next level

LevelEleven provides a cloud-based platform where sales managers can create fresh and compelling sales contests within Salesforce.com.  For example, the Detroit Pistons recently used LevelEleven to organize a sales contest for skyboxes at their arena, and drove sales of over a half a million dollars.  In other words, 50% of the skybox annual sales target was closed in a mere six weeks.

LevelEleven’s target prospect is a sales manager or sales operations manager in any company that uses Salesforce.com as their CRM system.  Today, LevelEleven’s sales team gets leads from four sources:

  1. The Salesforce.com AppExchange, where other Salesforce users search for partners.
  2. Conferences and trade shows, like Dreamforce.
  3. Registrations from content downloads at the LevelEleven website.
  4. Rented lists of prospects.

LevelEleven has tried a variety of list sources over the years, with mixed results.  In the first half of 2012, the prospecting sources produced zero in closed sales.  In June 2012, they began experimenting with Leadspace.  In the second half of 2012, a full 30% of LevelEleven closed deals came from this source.

According to Bob Marsh, CEO, the power of Leadspace for LevelEleven is its close targeting based on the LevelEleven customer profile.  “Leadspace helps us infer pretty accurately whether a prospect is using the Salesforce platform,” he says.  “And they deliver to us a short list of highly likely contacts in the account, like the Salesforce administrator or the sales operations manager.  Everyone on our sales team has a Leadspace license, and it is performing for us.”

It’s a good thing that the B2B list business is continuing to evolve in new directions. What new developments are you seeing?

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Ruth Stevens

About Ruth Stevens

Ruth P. Stevens consults on customer acquisition and retention, and teaches marketing at companies and business schools in the U.S. and abroad. Crain’s BtoB magazine named Ruth one of the 100 Most Influential People in Business Marketing. She is the author of Maximizing Lead Generation: The Complete Guide for B2B Marketers, and Trade Show and Event Marketing. Ruth serves as a director of Edmund Optics, Inc., the HIMMS Media Group, and the Business Information Industry Association. Learn more at www.ruthstevens.com.

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